Randox Lipoprotein(a) – superior methodology

The challenge for Lipoprotein(a) measurement

The size variation of apo(a), due to kringle 4 type 2 repeats, represents a major challenge for Lipoprotein(a) measurement. Depending on the size of apo(a) in an assay calibrator, many commercially available Lipoprotein(a) assays under- or overestimate apo(a) size in the patient sample. This will result in an underestimation of apo(a) in samples containing molecules smaller than that included in the assay’s calibrator and alternatively, an overestimation of the concentration in samples containing larger apo(a) particles- both these scenarios will lead to the delivery of inaccurate patient results.

The issue of apo(a) size-related bias was highlighted by the paper, ‘Use of a Reference Material Proposed by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine to Evaluate Analytical Methods for the Determination of Plasma Lipoprotein(a)’ ¹. In this study, 22 commercially available Lipoprotein(a) assays were evaluated against a gold-standard ELISA reference assay in order to determine the absolute bias displayed by each assay.

The Denka Seiken method which is used by the Randox Lipoprotein(a) assay was examined in this study and was shown to display minimal apo(a) size-related bias, significantly less than all the other assays, as well as the best concordance with the reference method. This is vital for the delivery of truly accurate and precise Lipoprotein(a) patient results.

Randox Lipoprotein(a)- overcoming size-related bias, for the most accurate results

As highlighted, the Randox Lipoprotein(a) assay employs the Denka Seiken method and therefore delivers a reagent of the highest performance standard to clinical laboratories. Due to the fact the Randox Lipoprotein(a) assay displays minimal apo(a) size-related bias, it will produce the most accurate results which laboratories and clinicians can have complete confidence in. However, Randox Lipoprotein(a) also goes beyond offering the most accurate method for Lipoprotein(a) measurement. Our assay offers a number of additional beneficial features – click here to find out more.

¹ Marcovina S.M. et al. (2000) Use of a Reference Material Proposed by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine to Evaluate Analytical Methods for the Determination of Plasma Lipoprotein(a). Clinical Chemistry 46: (12) 1956-1967.


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